Georgia Maintains a Temporary Protective Order Registry which includes the gender of the reported offender.

Over time the percentage of TPO's filed in Georgia with female offenders has increased while the total number of TPO's may be decreasing. When the registry was first started in 2002 there were a total of 7,738 TPO's filed -1,002 (13% of the total) listed a female offender. Use of the registry rapidly increased, by 2003 there were a total of 21,715 TPO's filed - 3,125 (14% of the total) of them listed a female offender. In 2015, there were a total of 23,950 TPO's filed and 24% (5,689) of them listed a female offender.



Georgia Temporary Protective Orders (2002-2015)


Year                 Total TPOs                                     Female Offenders

2002
7738
1002
2003
21715
3125
2004
22104
3516
2005
24003
4331
2006
24345
4674
2007
23488
4523
2008
23072
4680
2009
23549
4822
2010
22992
5010
2011
22418
4952
2012
23075
5150
2013
23048
5293

2014

2015

22560

23950

5328

5689


 The total number of TPO's filed isn't increasing but the percentage of female offenders is increasing.

There are two clear possibilities for that fact- either the rate of domestic violence by women is rapidly increasing AND the rate of domestic violence by men is decreasing, OR a high percentage of TPO's have been falsely filed by women against male targets of domestic violence.

Because it is hard for some to move away from the standard narrative that women are victims and men are abusers, there is a tendency to assume that some of those men who claim to be targets of false accusations are lying. However, there was no benefit to make that claim in the anonymous survey mentioned above. Most of the male targets of abuse still said that part of the abuse included false accusations against them.

To establish that TPO's are used as a way for female abusers to control their male target. We include an actual TPO as well as the accusers much later statement on a radio call in show that "no one was abusing anybody". There could not be clearer evidence that TPO's are used by abusers as weapons.

Temporary Protective Orders were first created at a time when it was assumed that women were helpless and needed to be protected through an ex parte legal mechanism. They allow a person to simply assert that they are a victim and allow a judge to then separate the target of the TPO from their children and home - without allowing the target of the TPO to defend themselves in court.

 

That would be fine if people only told the truth. Unfortunately abusers also lie to gain a legal advantage against their target. Because the standard narrative is that women are victims and men are abusers, TPOs are used by female abusers as weapons against their male targets.

A researcher into female perpetrated domestic violence surveyed 302 men who had been targets of abuse and found that most of them (67.2%) reported that their partner had falsely accused them of physical violence and 38.7% reported that she had filed a perjured restraining order against him. Half of the men with children (48.9%) reported that she had also falsely accused them of physically abusing the children and 15.4% reported that she had also falsely accused them of sexually abusing the children. This information is available here:

 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2913504/

A female abuser who separates her male target from his children is also abusing those children.

 

 

 

 

If you breakdown TPO filings in Georgia by both the gender of the offender and the county - you see a marked geographic variation. In the map below, counties that have a higher rate of female offenders in 2014 (less than 76% of the filings in that county allege a male offender are coded in green) and counties that have an excessively high rate of allegations by female filers ( 95% or higher of the filings allege a male offender are coded in pink) are shown. The single county with more alleged female offenders than alleged male offenders is coded in yellow.

Quick visual inspection of the map and knowledge of the Georgia's larger institutions of higher learning suggest that close proximity to a large college or university may protect from extreme gender discrimination in TPO filings.